home // Parenting // Toddlers

pdf download… -based parent education program to reduce the risk of infant and toddler …

… -based parent education program to reduce the risk of infant and toddler  … Source: extension.unh.edu
File Size: 148.13 KB
Page: 14 pages
Category: Parenting
Last Download : 34 days 22 hours 59 minutes ago

Share this info:


Short Description: Abstract Community-based parent education programs are a common component of service plans for abusive and potentially abusive parents. Despite their widespread use, few studies have evaluated the effect of such programs to change actual parenting...

Content Inside: Public Health Nursing Vol. 19 No. 5, pp. 377389 0737-1209/02/$15.00 Blackwell Publishing, Inc. Evaluation of a Clinic-Based Parent Education Program to Reduce the Risk of Infant and Toddler Maltreatment Colleen E. Huebner, Ph.D., M.P.H. Abstract Community-based parent education programs are a common component of service plans for abusive and potentially abusive parents. Despite their widespread use, few studies have evaluated the effect of such programs to change actual parenting behavior even though this is a key intervention goal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a relatively brief and inexpensive clinic-based education program could benefit parents of infants and toddlers by alleviating parental stress and improving parentchild interaction. Participants were 199 parents of children 1 through 36 months of age who were at risk for parenting problems and child maltreatment due to serious life stress including poverty, low social support, personal histories of childhood maltreatment, and substance abuse. Program effects were evaluated in terms of improvement in self-reported parenting stress and observed parentchild interaction. Positive effects were documented for the group as a whole and within each of three subgroups: two community samples and a group of mothers and children in residential drug treatment. Additional analyses illustrated a doseresponse relationship between program attendance and magnitude of gain in observed parenting skills. Key words: prevention, education, evaluation. maltreatment, children, parent INTRODUCTION Since entering national awareness in the United States in the mid-1960s, child maltreatment has received increasing public, professional, and policy attention. Efforts to protect children from injury and harm have resulted in federal legislation to define maltreatment, state statutes that mandate reporting, and the establishment of public agencies responsible for investigating and responding to allegations of abuse and neglect (Schene, 1998). Unfortunately knowledge of how to prevent child maltreatment has not kept pace with these other efforts (Gelles, 1998). In the United States, the prevalence of child maltreatment remains alarmingly high. A coordinated tracking system of all states' child protective services (CPS) activity indicates the number of reports increased from 2.6 million in 1990 to 2.9 million in 1994 (English, 1998) and has remained relatively steady since that time. The most recent data, now available for 1999, show that CPS agencies received referrals involving approximately 2,974,000 children that year (U.S. DHHS, 2001). In 1999, and consistent with past years, more than half of all child victims were victims of neglect (58.4%) and the next most frequent type was physical abuse (21.3%). Children are most likely to experience abuse or neglect by family members. In 1999, 87.3% of perpetrators were parents (U.S. DHHS, 2001). Risk and Consequences of Maltreatment of Young Children Empirical research has identified numerous economic and psychosocial factors associated with child maltreatment. In addition to the stress of extreme poverty, parental risk factors include personal childhood experiences of Colleen E. Huebner is Associate Professor with the University of Washington. Address correspondence to Colleen E. Huebner, Ph.D., M.P.H., Maternal and Child Health Program, Box 357230, Department of Health Services, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. E-mail: colleenh@u.washington.edu 377

Advertiser

download pdf for free Go to Download Page

Related PDF Files